Engineering: From Cheesecake to Healthcare

May 30, 2009

My background is in writing, not so much in engineering. Ok, not at all engineering. The closest I came to engineering before working at NI was when a friend of mine made a cheesecake from Cooking for Engineers. The cheesecake was one of the best I have ever had, but I couldn’t bring myself to read the copiousinstruction manual recipe that divulges the secrets of recreating it.

However, over the past three years, I have grown a fondness for engineers. My co-blogger friend, Emilie, can easily put together a LEGO Mindstorms robot, or tell me how a clock works or what in the world this is all about. She also knows more acronyms than a government lobbyist in a controversial state. And that impresses me.

Anyhow, I sprend a lot of time reading stories accounts case studies about what engineers are doing with NI products. Some of them, though I know are crucial to the technological advancement of this great country, I find horridly boring. I think my ignorance puts up a barrier between me and said applications (see how I did not link to any applications? Because at least I am decent at communicating, I know that doing so would be career-limiting). No, really. There are so many applications that are so far over my head that I hand them to Emilie and tell her I am not sure about them. She reads them, explains how great they are, and then I am on my merry way. Ignorance deflected, and I then have a new appreciation for something I once thought boring.

However, there are some case studies that are initially touching.

Some applications that I just can’t quit reading. Like this one:

Engineers at a University in Scotland are working with Malawi Polytechnic school to create mobile health clinics, and they’ve created a facility where they can actually create these mobile clinics, as well as perform routine maintainence and make sure the clinics are using enercy as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible.

At the remote health clinic manufacturing facility, mobile clinics or other mobile organizations can be manufactured, outfitted with appropriate interior equipment, and equipped with solar, wind, or microhydroelectric generating equipment. Currently, one remote health clinic facility is located in Makata, a small village in Malawi.
https://i2.wp.com/sine.ni.com/cms/images/casestudies/malawi.jpg

Engineering that results in deliciuos cheesecake, I get. Engineering that results in providing medical care in remote areas to those who wouldn’t otherwise receive it, I also get.

You can read the full case study here: http://sine.ni.com/cs/app/doc/p/id/cs-11858

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2 Responses to “Engineering: From Cheesecake to Healthcare”


  1. […] Sweet Apps Blog Just another WordPress.com weblog « Engineering: From Cheesecake to Healthcare […]


  2. […] to you about using an Apple computer? You should know from my posts about bras, elephants, and cheesecake that I don’t actually know a lot about computers or […]


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